What Do you Know about the Book of Psalms?

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The book of The Psalms is the hymn book and prayer book of the Bible. Composed by different authors over a long period of time, these hymns and prayers were collected and used by the people of Israel in their worship and eventually this collection was included in their scriptures.

These religious poems are of many kinds; there are hymns of praise and worship of God; prayers for help, protection and salvation; pleas for forgiveness; songs of thanksgiving of God’s blessings; and petitions for the punishment of enemies. These prayers are both personal and national; some portray the most intimate feelings of one person, while others represent the needs and feelings of all the people of God.

The Psalms were used by Jesus, quoted by the writers of the New Testament, and became the treasured book of worship of the Christian Church from its beginning.

David is listed as the author of 73 psalms, Asaph of 12, and the sons of Korah of 11. Other psalms were written by Solomon, Heman the Ezrahite, Ethan the Ezrahite, and Moses (Psalm 90). The earliest extant copy of Psalms is from the Dead Sea Scrolls from about the first century AD. That copy shows that the division into five books extends to at least that time and certainly earlier.

The 150 Psalms are grouped into five collections, or books, as follows:

  • Psalms 1 – 41
  • Psalms 42 – 72
  • Psalms 73 – 89
  • Psalms 90 – 106
  • Psalms 107 – 150

Each of these five books or sections of Psalms ends with a doxology or a song of praise. The final verse of each concluding psalm includes either “Praise the Lord!” or “Amen.” For example, the final verse of Psalm 41 ends this way: “Praise be to the Lord, the God of Israel, / from everlasting to everlasting. / Amen and Amen.” Psalm 150, the final psalm, serves as the fitting final doxology, concluding with the words, “Let everything that has breath praise the Lord. / Praise the Lord.”

SOURCE: Good News Bible and www..gotquestions.org

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